AWARDS, HONORS AND RECOGNITION FOR THEATREWORKSUSA

  • Drama Desk Award, May 1996, given by New York theatre critics for Theatreworks' "35 years of providing quality entertainment to children -- and their parents."
  • Lucille Lortel Award, May 1996, given by Off Broadway theatres and producers, for "Outstanding Special Achievement."
  • The William M. Dawson Award, January 1998, given by Association of Performing Arts Presenters for "Programmatic Excellence."
  • Jonathan Larson Performing Arts Foundation Award, 2001, for "Theatreworks' artistic vision and commitment to the support and development of theatre artists."
  • In May 2000, Theatreworks' founders Jay Harnick and Charles Hull each received the Actors' Fund of America Medal of Honor.
  • A Straw Hat Award for Best Play awarded to The Color of Justice by TheaterWeek columnist Peter Filichia. The play, which premiered in the summer of 1996, is about Thurgood Marshall and young Linda Brown, and Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court decision that overturned segregation in the public schools.
  • Theatreworks performed: First Lady, a musical about Eleanor Roosevelt, at The White House in 1984; We the People, about the U.S. Constitution, at the Capitol in the bicentennial celebration broadcast nationwide; Class Clown (illiteracy) on the Washington Mall for the 30th anniversary of the Peace Corps; and performs annually at the Kennedy Center.
  • In 1984 at the Twelfth Annual Black Theatre Awards, Play to Win (musical about Jackie Robinson breaking the color barrier in major league baseball) earned an AUDELCO Award for "best writing of a new show by black authors for the non-commercial theatre."
  • At the 1984 World's Fair in New Orleans, Theatreworks was one of only four theatres selected to represent the United States in the World Festival of Theatre for Young Audiences.
  • Our musical Lady Liberty was commissioned by The Kennedy Center in 1984 as a tribute to the Statue of Liberty for her Centennial.
  • In October of 1990, Theatreworks had the honor of presenting Jekyll and Hyde at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Launching the national "All Babies Count" conference in Washington, D.C., it brought together prominent leaders in the fields of health care, education, and the media to discuss specific problems of drug and alcohol abuse among pregnant women and drug-exposed infants.